Cornelia Schleime:
Picture "Balancing Woman (Orange Robe)" (1999) (Unique piece)
New
Proportional view
Picture "Balancing Woman (Orange Robe)" (1999) (Unique piece)
Cornelia Schleime:
Picture "Balancing Woman (Orange Robe)" (1999) (Unique piece)
New

Quick info

unique piece | signed | dated | watercolour on Japanese paper | framed | size 63 x 83 cm

Product no. IN-948415.R1
Picture "Balancing Woman (Orange Robe)" (1999) (Unique piece)
Cornelia Schleime: Picture "Balancing Woman (Orange Robe)...

Detailed description

Picture "Balancing Woman (Orange Robe)" (1999) (Unique piece)

At first glance, the present work shows the pleasing motif of a woman in an orange dress, surrounded by a yellow background that harmonises with her colours. However, the background reveals itself to be a colourful landscape without clear spatial structures, within which the young, concentrated-looking woman carefully places one foot in front of the other.

Her search for balance is emphasised by the balancing pole. Is she an artist on a tightrope or a young woman navigating her way through life?

Cornelia Schleime works with the unconscious and the surreal in her pictures, which are hidden behind a seemingly simple harmonious representation, only gradually revealing themselves and then becoming increasingly clear within the viewer's own imagination.

Watercolour and ink on fibrous, yellow Japanese paper, 1999, signed and dated. Motif size/sheet size 55 x 75 cm. Size in frame 63 x 83 cm as shown.

About Cornelia Schleime

The art of Cornelia Schleime, born in Berlin in 1953, is characterised by a delightful tendency towards exaggeration. Her artistic means are impressively diverse, whether painting, music, literature or film.

Cornelia Schleime is one of the best-known German painters of her generation. In addition to painting, she is also artistically active as a photographer, filmmaker, performer and author. Schleime was born in East Berlin and studied graphic art and painting at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts. However, she was banned by the GDR government from exhibiting in 1981 and obtained permission to leave the GDR in 1984. Schleime was only able to take a few of her works with her so that a large part of her early work is now considered lost.

Especially her portraits are much admired. Since the 1990s, she has been bringing her protagonists closer and closer. She develops haunting portraits of women and children, couples kissing, lascivious nuns, even the Pope. With an inquiring gaze, the artist approaches the face, the ever-changing countenance of the human being – it becomes wrapped, veiled, sometimes with a mask.

Schleime has received numerous scholarships and awards. Her paintings are part of collections worldwide, such as the Gemäldegalerie der Staatlichen Kunstsammlungen, Dresden and the Getty Museum, Los Angeles. She lives and works in Berlin, in Ruppiner Land and on La Palma.

Recommendations